29 Dec

Thank you to Nick Bennett [@peds_id_doc] Assistant Professor in Pediatric Infectious Disease for permitting me to repost here.

The message:  many febrile illnesses in our [Western – developed country] community are due to viruses for which there are generally no effective treatments. If you or your children have a fever it may last up to three weeks and this is not affected by the use of oral antibiotics. So, in almost all cases treat the symptoms – fever control, pain management, light diet with plenty of fluids. [A Cochrane review for basis of this approach in case of respiratory tract infectionshttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD004417.pub3/full]

culture and sensitivity

I joke that, as a Peds ID doc, it is my duty to say this at least once a day…

20121130-230002.jpg

Ok, I may not literally be slapping people upside the head, but there are certainly times when I’m doing it in my mind. The situation is common enough – a patient, parent or doctor, faced with symptoms consistent with an infectious disease, considers using antibiotics to treat bacteria. After all, we know that bacteria kill people, right? But in many of these situations the patient really has a viral infection – and viruses aren’t affected by antibiotics. So at the very least we’re wasting money and drugs. Worst case scenario? We’re promoting drug-resistant bacteria, antibiotic allergies and side effects – that in some cases can be life-threatening.

But aren’t there clues to help us make the distinction? Real clinical signs and symptoms? Well, lets review a few.

White pus on…

View original post 1,359 more words

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Jim McManus blogs on public health, ethics, books, theology and more