Tag Archives: primary health care
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Revised Section 75 regs mire CCGs in a legal minefield

12 Mar

Further trouble not less after Government tables revised regulations on competition for providers. Who would be a Commissioner?

CCG Watch - your chance to save NHS services

Minefield (n) /ˈmīnˌfēld/: an area laid with explosive devices, intended to prevent incursion or protect a valuable target

I’ve spent a pleasant couple of hours reading through the government’s hurriedly-drafted amendments to its ‘Section 75’ (S75) regulations. These new rules, which the government tried to slip through Parliament without debate or vote, were designed to force the new Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) to invite private providers to bid on any NHS contract, were blocked by Labour with the assistance of a brave LibDem MP (I know, there aren’t many these days).

The government ‘paused’ its legislation with a promise to rewrite it to calm the fears of LibDem objectors, with health minister Norman Lamb claiming that the government took the objections extremely seriously and was committed to honouring its 2012 promises that CCGs would not be forced to include private providers unless they felt it best for the population they…

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Shame

16 Nov

A superb essay on addressing “Shame” in order to help people recover from depression and health care professionals develop better emotional resilience.

A Better NHS

Masaccio: The Expulsion of Adam and Eve from Eden 1425

Through the concrete physicality of the two figures and the arid landscape around them, Masaccio makes believable the first dolorous steps of human beings on earth, in the solitude of the shame of sin and the dramatic experience of pain. Quoted from ‘Medicine in Art’ Getty Publications. p.292

One of my patients, June, was standing near the entrance of the surgery when I came back from a home visit. June and I had been through a lot together in the two years since she came to see me with a breast lump, her subsequent mastectomy and chemotherapy, her husband’s dementia and death, and her depression and redundancy, but in recent months she had been steadily recovering and rebuilding her life and her health. The last few times we met she had been really well and we had time to talk…

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We Can Treat The Cancer, But Can We Care For The Survivors?

20 Sep

We Can Treat The Cancer, But Can We Care For The Survivors?.

Managing the health needs of people who have survived invasive cancer deserves more attention.

With 20 years behind me since my own lymphoma treatment it is clear that no-one is particularly interested in the emotional toll surviving brings.

Delivering Medicine in Nunavut (via Dr. Ottematic)

20 Sep

Remarkable summary of remote/rural medicine in Inuit Community. Interesting to reflect that the population is grateful to have its needs met while the healthcare system imposes ‘risk management’ to the same level as urban centre. Surely that state of affairs cannot continue in the current economic climate.

Delivering Medicine in Nunavut Rankin Inlet in Nunavut is in Canada. Despite this, the medical scene there sometimes bears closer resemblance to what I’ve seen in Nepal and Vietnam than what comes into clinic on Vancouver Island. an Inukshuk stands tall over the town of Rankin Inlet Because it is in Canada, one is expected to provide the Canadian standard of care. In some ways we need to give Toronto-level intervention with a fraction of the resources. The Kivalliq Health Cent … Read More

via Dr. Ottematic

Illusions of Autonomy

Where medical ethics and human behaviour meet, by Dr Philip Berry

Enjoying every second

Cada lugar, cada rincón, cada momento compartido arreglando el mundo entre imprescindibles

The Commonplace Book

Jim McManus blogs on public health, ethics, books, theology and more